Tool order intake is on the riseClick image to enlarge

While many industries continue to suffer under the yoke of Covid-19, Canada’s machine tool business has rebounded strongly with significant increases in orders for both metal cutting and metal forming, according to Marc Hasrouny, president of the Canadian Machine Tool Distributors’ Association (CMTDA).

The Canadian machine tool market was heavily impacted at the start of the pandemic with orders for metal cutting down 33% in 2020 and 20% for metal forming. Metal cutting was particularly under stress as that part of the industry had already faced an 8% drop in orders in 2019 as a result of a slumping economy.

But things started to improve significantly this year with order intakes returning to more normal levels.

“Comparing year to date figures through October 2021, metal cutting was up 59% and metal forming was up 50% over October 2020 and comparable to 2019 levels,” Hasrouny told members of CMTDA gathered in Milton this week for the association’s annual general meeting.

But it’s not all positive news ahead. Supply chain disruptions are posing a significant threat that is lasting longer than expected. High freight and raw material prices and significant delays in delivery due to the lack of available labour and containers have presented importers and manufacturers with cause for concern, Hasrouny said.

The good thing about the supply chain disruptions is that they have been significant and crippling enough to the North American economy that they have captured the attention of political leaders who are mobilizing to rectify the issue, Hasrouny said.

 

Automotive tooling solutions

Iscar Tools spotlights tooling advances for the automotive manufacturing industry

Constantly changing factors such as unstable oil prices, ever more demanding environmental protection legislations and the evolution of more efficient technologies ensures a continually changing global automotive market place. These factors also increase the ongoing competition between carmakers and OEMs and dictate today's automotive industry manufacturing trends.

Canada could get break on metals tariffs, White House says

Canada could still avoid being subject to US proposed heavy tariffs on steel and aluminum.

Ford unveils the Lightning all-electric F-150

In a glitzy online extravaganza dubbed by Bill Ford as a “generational celebration,” the company that brought us the pickup truck has introduced the Holy Grail of today’s automotive industry—an electric F-150 pickup truck.

Balance Matters

by Drew Strauchen

4 ways proper tooling balance saves time and eliminates problems

Tungaloy adds Toronto-area sales engineer

Tungaloy has announced the addition of Jason Bainbridge to the Tungaloy GTA team as sales and application engineer.

Holemaking Options

by Marlon Blandon

There’s more than one way to drill, thread and chamfer that hole

INKAS introduces armoured 2019 Escalade platform

INKAS Armored Vehicle Manufacturing has introduced its Armored Cadillac Escalade “Chairman Package” for 2019.

Fanuc reaches major robot milestone

Fanuc has produced its 750,000th industrial robot, representing a record high point in the robotics industry.

Inter Pipeline nabs $408M provincial grant

Inter Pipeline Ltd. will receive $408 million from the Alberta Petrochemicals Incentive Program (APIP) to support the company’s Heartland Petrochemical Complex (HPC).

Ontario equipment maker lands $300 M deal

Niagara, ON, equipment manufacturer Whiting Equipment Canada Inc. has been awarded a multi-million dollar contract to supply salt evaporators and potash crystallizers from VALE for the company's potash plant in Argentina.

Fabricating in Canada

FABTECH Canada is the country’s premier event for metal forming, fabricating, welding and finishing

Toolbuilder Emuge-Franken celebrates 100th anniversary

Emuge-Franken a leading manufacturer of rotary cutting tools, is celebrating its centennial.

From coding to chipmaking

by Kip Hanson

Kitchener software developer tackles high speed machining

Machining small

by Kip Hanson

Why average sized machining centres provide lower than average results when milling small workpieces

Companies poorly prepared for new energy economy, research finds

New research from Schneider Electric indicates that while most organizations feel ready for a decentralized, decarbonized and digitized future, many aren’t taking the necessary steps to integrate and advance their energy and sustainability programs.

Jean-Pascal Tricoire, chairman and CEO, Schneider Electric

Stay In Touch

twitter facebook linkedIn