Morphing metal: new material developed by engineers at Cornell UniversityClick image to enlargeEngineers at Cornell Univeristy in Ithaca, NY, have developed a hybrid material comprised of stiff metal and soft, prorous rubber foam that combines the best properties of both-stiffness when it's required and elasticity when a change of shape is needed. And, perhaps of greatest importance, the material has the ability to self-heal if damaged.

The research presents a platform for truly futurisitc shape-shifting objects.

"Imagine an aircraft that could alter its wing shape in midflight and, like a pelican, dive into the water before morphing into a submarine," notes a March 21 press release issued by Cornell Univesity.

“It’s sort of like us – we have a skeleton, plus soft muscles and skin,” says Rob Shepherd, Cornell Univeristy engineering professor. “Unfortunately, that skeleton limits our ability to change shape – unlike an octopus, which does not have a skeleton.”

The idea blends the rigidity and load-bearing capacity of humans with the ability to dramatically alter shape, like an octopus.

“That’s what this idea is about, to have a skeleton when you need it, melt it away when you don’t, and then reform it,” Shepherd said.

This hybrid material combines a soft alloy called Field’s metal with a porous silicone foam. In addition to its low melting point of 144 degrees Fahrenheit, Field’s metal was chosen because, unlike similar alloys, it contains no lead.

“In general, we want the things we make in this lab to be biocompatible,” said Ilse Van Meerbeek, a graduate student in the field of mechanical engineering and a contributor to the paper.

The elastomer foam is dipped into the molten metal, then placed in a vacuum so that the air in the foam’s pores is removed and replaced by the alloy. The foam had pore sizes of about 2 millimeters; that can be tuned to create a stiffer or a more flexible material.

In testing of its strength and elasticity, the material showed an ability to deform when heated above 144 degrees, regain rigidity when cooled, then return to its original shape and strength when reheated.

“Sometimes you want a robot, or any machine, to be stiff,” said Shepherd, whose group recently published a paper on electroluminescent skin, which also has applications in soft robotics. “But when you make them stiff, they can’t morph their shape very well. And to give a soft robot both capabilities, to be able to morph their structure but also to be stiff and bear load, that’s what this material does.”

His group’s work has been published in Advanced Materials and will be the cover story in an upcoming issue of the journal’s print edition.

The work was supported by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Science Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Emuge industry first: general purpose tap

Calling it an industry first, Emuge's MultiTap is a high performance tap designed for threading a range of materials including carbon steel, steel alloys, stainless steel, aluminum, cast iron, copper, brass and bronze.

Elliott Matsuura Canada Inc.

Based in Oakville, Ontario, Elliott Matsuura Canada Inc. has been supplying and supporting quality machine tools to the Canadian metal cutting industry since 1950. Elliott carries a full range of metalworking machinery,

Kennametal: Tapping into the wind turbine market

New high performance taps for large diameter tapping from Kennametal feature a wear-resistant powder metal substrate and proprietary top layers and coatings, designed wind turbine component machining of hubs, rings and gearbox housings.

Multi-Tasking: Is it Right for Your Shop?

For manufacturers looking to achieve that competitive edge, you can do no better than a multi-tasking machine. They eliminate the need for separate milling and turning machines, multiple set-ups and, most importantly, they improve productivity.

The Rules of X-Ray Micro CT (and When to Break Them)

Offer the term “metrology equipment” to a group of industrial or manufacturing engineers in a word-association test and it's highly likely CMM (coordinate measuring machine) would be the response.

Stay In Touch

twitter facebook linkedIn