GM Canada Oshawa assembly plantClick image to enlarge

GM Canada says it plans to provide financial support to the close to 3,000 workers who will be losing their jobs at the Osahwa, ON, assembly plant when it closes in 2019.

"My priority is to have a transition plan for every Oshawa Assembly employee," said GM Canada president and managing director, Travis Hester. "We will work with our community colleges, universities, the government and all interested local employers, to make this happen and we are committing millions of dollars from GM Canada to support this effort."

GM Canada has been contacted by a variety of individual employers with job opportunities for the highly skilled employees at Oshawa Assembly. Job fairs and targeted training programs are being prepared by a coalition of local partners to help auto workers transition to their next careers. More details of specific support from GM Canada and others will be confirmed as the company works with Unifor and its partners.

Since the General Motors Accelerated Transformation announcement on November 26, GM Canada and its community partners have identified: 

  • 300 open jobs for auto technicians at GM dealerships in Ontario; 
  • 100 jobs that will be open at GM's other facilities in Ontario; 
  • 2,000 jobs in energy and other industries in Durham;
  • A first local initiative: a one-stop, confidential portal will be launched in the new year byDurham College to help auto workers identify job openings, learn about new careers and begin training plans to ensure a smooth career transition. This will be followed by other on-line tools to assist auto workers.

More than 50 per cent of Oshawa Assembly permanent hourly workers now qualify for a GM Canada defined benefit pension, providing them a choice to move to retirement. GM's November announcement impacts 2,600 hourly workers and approximately 340 salaried or contract workers at the Oshawa Assembly Plant. GM Canada will continue to discuss its announcements regarding Oshawa Assembly with Unifor.

GM announced its global Accelerated Transformation program on November 26 to advance the company's vision of zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion through a series of restructuring actions in the United States, Canadaand globally. GM Canada also operates the CAMI Assembly plant in Ingersoll, Ontario, the St. Catharines Engine and Transmission plant and a growing series of Canadian Technical Centres developing new automotive technologies of the future. 

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