Scientists working on a made-in-Canada ventilator. Image: ShutterstockClick image to enlarge

Canadian scientists at two national laboratories are working on a stipped-down, easy-to-manufacturer hospital ventilator to meet the demand for machines because of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a story in The Globe and Mail.

Lead by Arthur McDonald, a Queen's University professor who shared the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics is leading the effort.

"Researchers at the TRIUMF particle accelerator in Vancouver and the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories at Chalk River, Ont., are now aiming to complete two working prototypes of their ventilator, one at each location, over the coming week," notes the story.

McDonald is quoted in the Globe and Mail story as saying that “every country is going to have to have its own made-in-country solution for ventilators," said Dr. McDonald, who is best known for his experimental work involving neutrinos, elusive particles produced in the core of the sun. “The idea is that the capability is here in the particle physics community. We’re just trying to exploit it.”

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