CANADA'S LEADING INFORMATION SOURCE FOR THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY

LATEST MAGAZINE

CANADA'S LEADING INFORMATION SOURCE FOR THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY

CANADA'S LEADING INFORMATION SOURCE FOR THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY

Canadian manufacturers add workers for second straight month

Share This Post
Despite consecutive advances, manufacturing employment is still down since the beginning of the year. PHOTO courtesy Sherbrooke Gear Works.

Manufacturing employment increased by 3,400 in April, following a gain of 9,300 jobs in March.

However, despite these consecutive advances, employment is still down by 7,400 since the beginning of the year.

“Manufacturers continue to confront multiple challenges, including persistent workforce issues, high interest rates, and soft global demand. These factors are limiting their need and ability to hire new workers,” comments Alan Arcand, chief economist with Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters.

Meanwhile, the jobless rate in manufacturing fell from 4.1% in March to 3.9% in April.

Year-over-year wage growth in the manufacturing sector also decelerated last month, slowing from 4.3% in March to 3.7% in April, the slowest reading since July 2022. The average factory worker earned $34.21 an hour in April 2024 compared to $32.98 an hour in the same month a year ago.

ONTARIO AND ALBERTA DRIVE EMPLOYMENT GAINS IN MANUFACTURING

Regionally, employment increased in 9 of 10 provinces in April. The biggest absolute gains were recorded in Ontario (+25,000), BC (+23,400), and Quebec (+19,200), while the largest proportional increase was observed in New Brunswick (+7,800). This was Quebec’s first significant gain in employment since September 2023. Nova Scotia was the only province to lose jobs last month, with a modest decline of just 900 positions.

In the manufacturing sector, employment was up in six provinces in April, led by Ontario (+5,100) and Alberta (+1,300). In proportional terms, Nova Scotia (+700) and New Brunswick (+500) also experienced solid gains in factory payrolls last month. On the downside, these increases were partially offset by a significant pullback in BC (-5,600). Taking a longer-term view, Ontario’s manufacturers (+23,900) have created the most jobs over the last year, while Quebec’s manufacturers (-22,600) have shed the most workers.

Share This Post


Recent Articles



Wordpress Social Share Plugin powered by Ultimatelysocial
error

Enjoy this post? Share with your network