CANADA'S LEADING INFORMATION SOURCE FOR THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY

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CANADA'S LEADING INFORMATION SOURCE FOR THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY

CANADA'S LEADING INFORMATION SOURCE FOR THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY

Desktop Metal Qualifies Nickel Alloy Inconel 625 for Additive Manufacturing on the Studio System 2

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Additive manufacturing technologies provider Desktop Metal, Inc. has qualified the use of IN625 for its Studio System, a metal 3D printing platform that offers customers a way to print high-performance metal parts in low volumes for pre-production and end-use applications.

The Desktop Metal Studio System platform now offers a total of eight material, which Desktop Metal says is more than any other metal extrusion 3D printing system on the marketl.

In addition to IN625, Studio System users can now print titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Ti64), copper, 4140, two tool steels (H13 and D2), and two stainless steels (17-4PH and 316L). Shipments of IN625 are available now.

“The Studio System 2, which features our streamlined and easy-to-use two-step process, remains the most flexible metal 3D printer in its class,” said Ric Fulop, Founder and CEO of Desktop Metal. “It’s never been more important for manufacturers to have the agility of on-site, on-demand metal production, and the Studio System is a perfect gateway into metal 3D printing for production. Adding IN625 to the portfolio only amplifies the flexibility of this proven system.”

IN625 is a high-performance nickel alloy known for high levels of strength, temperature resistance, and corrosion resistance — making it a popular material choice for applications in the aerospace, chemical processing, and offshore energy industries.

However, the strength of IN625 is also what makes it a difficult and expensive material to machine into complex shapes. The process typically requires a skilled machinist and special CNC cutting tools, strategies and coolants to shape. It’s not uncommon for cutting tools to be broken or deformed when milling Inconel stock or for the material to deform when the outer layer hardens too quickly in response to machining.

“Producing IN625 parts with the Studio System 2 is fast, safe and affordable. Users can directly print and sinter final, end-use parts or near-net shape parts that can be precision machined for key surfaces with ease,” the company claims in a release.

The Studio System 2 leverages Desktop Metal’s proprietary Bound Metal Deposition (BMD) technology to produce parts. The two-step process provides a nearly hands-free experience, while eliminating loose powders and dangerous lasers commonly associated with metal 3D printing. Consisting of a printer and furnace, the Studio System 2 simplifies in-house low volume production of a wide range of complex geometries with outstanding surface finish and high-performance mechanical properties.

To learn more about the Studio System and available materials, visit www.desktopmetal.com.

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