Lincoln Electric will open its new welding technology and training center at its Euclid, Ohio, campus in January, with classes set to begin Jan. 8.

Lincoln Welding Training CenterClick image to enlarge

Commemorating the 100th anniversary of Lincoln's legacy welding school, the new center’s opening maintains the company’s role of running the oldest continually-operating welding school in the world. The facility further reflects Lincoln Electric’s 100-year commitment to leading welding education and innovation in an era of strong demand for skilled trades.

“This new Welding Technology & Training Center reinforces Lincoln Electric’s dedication to education and the future of welding,” says Jason Scales, manager, Education Solutions, Lincoln Electric. “We design our welding curriculum and programs to meet the needs of students and educators at every level – from basic welding and teaching techniques through advanced processes, such as robotic automation, specialized code certification, welding theory, welding procedure specifications and more."

The two-story, 100,000-square-feet-plus facility doubles Lincoln’s welding education capacity. The building features a virtual reality training lab with 10 VRTEX Virtual Reality Web Simulation Trainers, 166 welding and cutting booths, six seminar rooms, 13 welding school classrooms, a 100-seat auditorium, an atrium and a reception area.

The Lincoln Electric Welding Technology & Training Center is equipped to help students focus on career pathways and looks to the industry’s future in its programming offerings. It also will showcase and integrate Lincoln Electric’s latest technologies and solutions into a comprehensive welding curriculum – making it the industry’s most advanced facility of its kind.

“We know the demand for comprehensive skills and knowledge is higher than ever and we’re committed to preparing the next generation of welders, managers and industry leaders,” adds Scales.

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